Family

“Recovery After Stroke: Coping with Emotions” via National Stroke Association.

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*The complete article can be found here.

Dealing with a flood of emotions can be hard for stroke survivors. Some emotions are normal responses to the changes in your life after stroke. Others are common but should not be considered a normal part of stroke recovery. If you suffer from depression, anxiety or emotions that are not in line with the occasion, seek help.

Dealing with Depression

Grieving for what you have lost is good for you. But when sadness turns to depression, it’s time to act. Depression can take hold right after a stroke, during rehabilitation (rehab) or after you go home. It can be – but not always – caused by brain damage from the stroke. Mild or major, it is the most common emotional problem faced by survivors.

Your treatment may include counseling, medicine or both.

Depression symptoms include:

  •  Feeling sad or “empty” most of the time
  •  Loss of interest or pleasure in ordinary activities
  •  Fatigue or feeling “slowed down”
  •  Sudden trouble sleeping or oversleeping
  •  Sudden loss of appetite or weight gain
  •  Being unable to concentrate, remember or make decisions like you used to
  •  Feeling worthless or helpless
  •  Feelings of guilt
  •  Ongoing thoughts of death or suicide, suicide planning or attempts
  • A sudden change in how easily you are annoyed  Crying all the time

    Some useful tips:

     Make the most of rehab; the more you recover, the better you will feel

    Spend time with family and friends

     Maintain your quality of life by staying active and doing things you enjoy

     Seek help soon after you note symptom

Having Extreme Anxiety

Anxiety is an overwhelming sense of worry or fear. It can include increased sweating or heart rate. Among stroke survivors, feelings of anxiety are common. Often, stroke survivors suffer from both depression and anxiety at the same time.

Anxiety can affect rehab progress, daily living, relationships and quality of life. So, be sure to seek help right away.

Anxiety symptoms include:

  •   Ongoing worrying, fear, restlessness and irritability that don’t seem to let up
  •   Low energy
  •   Poor concentration
  •   Muscle tension
  •   Feeling panicky and out of breath
  •   Scary rapid heart beat
  •   Shaking
  •   Headache
  •   Feeling sick to your stomach

    Again, treatment may include counseling, medicine or both.

Uncontrolled Emotions

Do you find yourself laughing or crying at all the wrong times? If so, you may suffer from Pseudobulbar Affect (PBA). Also called emotional incontinence or pathologic lability, PBA is a common medical problem among stroke survivors. It can cause you to laugh at a funeral or cry at a comedy club. It can even make you cry uncontrollably for little or no reason. For this, it is often confused with depression. But, PBA is not depression.

People with PBA are unable to control their emotional expressions the way they used to. When this happens in social settings, they feel embarrassed, frustrated and angry. They also sense that others are uneasy. They may avoid work, public places and family get-togethers. This can lead to feelings of fear, shame and isolation.

There is no treatment approved by the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) for PBA, though antidepressant drugs can help.

These things may help you cope with PBA:

  •  Be open about it. Warn people that you cannot always control your emotions.
  • Explain that the emotions you show on the outside don’t always reflect how you feel on the inside.
  •  Distract yourself. If you feel an outburst coming on, focus on something boring or unrelated. Try counting the number of items on a shelf.
  •   Note the posture you take when crying. When you think you are about to cry, change your posture.
  •   Breathe in and out slowly until you are in control.
  •   Relax your forehead, shoulders and other muscles that tense up when crying.

    What Can Help

  •   Ask your doctor about emotional changes and symptoms early on.
  •   Ask your family to stimulate your interest in people and social activities.
  •   Stay as active as possible and stay involved in your hobbies.
  •   Set goals and measure accomplishment.
  •   Plan daily activities to provide structure and sense of purpose.
  • Stay involved with people, thoughts and activities that you enjoy.

    Get information on stroke recovery from National Stroke Association. Visit http://www.stroke.org or call 1- 800-STROKES (1-800-787- 6537).

    Contact your local stroke association. Join a stroke support group. Other survivors will understand your issues, and offer support and ideas to help you manage your emotions.

     

    Speak openly and honestly to your caregivers about your emotional changes. They’ll be glad you did, and together you can work out a solution.

     

    Professionals Help:

     Psychologists, psychiatrists and other mental health professionals experienced with stroke-related emotional disorders.

     

    Rehabilitation is a lifetime commitment and an important part of recovering from a stroke. Through rehabilitation, you relearn basic skills such as talking, eating, dressing and walking. Rehabilitation can also improve your strength, flexibility and endurance. The goal is to regain as much independence as possible.

    Remember to ask your doctor, “Where am I on my stroke recovery journey?

Fayette Encore Patient of the Month, Sherman Lee.

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We would like to recognize our Fayette Encore Patient of the Month, Sherman Lee. Sherman is a native of Fayette, AL and has been coming to our clinic to receive physical therapy after his total knee replacement. He has been receiving therapy treatment for 2 months now and has been improving greatly! Keep up the good work Mr. Lee!

“I have been to Encore before at the Winfield location. This is a great bunch of professionals and I love the way they treat their patients. I want to stay with Encore.”

-Mr. Lee.

“The Link Between Nutrition and Pain Is too Strong to Ignore” via APTA.

By Joe Tatta, PT, DPT, via APTA

Here’s a situation I bet you see all too often in your practice: a patient or client comes to you to overcome pain and increase mobility, and you see almost immediately that working on the mechanics of motion won’t be enough—they could really benefit from some lifestyle changes as well. Frequently, one of those changes involves thinking more carefully about the food they’re putting into their bodies.

Despite Hippocrates’ oft-quoted “Let food be thy medicine,” most physicians receive only a few hours of instruction about nutrition and coaching to help patients change their eating habits. Yet studies like this one from the National Institutes of Health show nutritional education becomes an incredibly useful tool to improve overall health outcomes for patients and specifically reduce inflammation.

As PTs, we are presented with a real opportunity here. Research shows that PTs can play an active role in lifestyle-related interventions such as nutrition. Providing information on nutrition will put you ahead of the curve with your peers while improving your patients’ results.

Early in my practice, I saw how obesity often contributed to my patients’ pain. Once I began providing information on some simple diet and lifestyle strategies with my patients, many lost weight, felt better, and dramatically reduced their pain. Nutrition became the missing link to help my patients manage and relieve pain.

Over time, I’ve found that nutritional screening and informational strategies can make a difference in 5 conditions associated with pain that we often see in our practices:

  1. Inflammation. Copious inflammatory foods, including vegetable oils, populate the Western diet. Most observational and interventional studies show a traditional Mediterranean diet, rich in healthy fatty acids, fruits, vegetables and fiber, provides anti-inflammatory benefits. Among specific conditions, studies show a Mediterranean diet rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids and antioxidants provide anti-inflammatory effects that benefit individuals with rheumatoid arthritis. Epidemiologic and clinical evidence likewise shows an optimal diet can reduce inflammation that, among other things, contributes to metabolic syndrome.
  2. Obesity. As we all know, a vicious cycle ensues as obesity contributes to numerous chronic pain conditions, and the pain in turn can lead to sedentary behavior that increases obesity. Studies prove what I’ve seen countless times in my own practice: weight loss must become a crucial aspect of overall pain rehabilitation.
  3. Osteoarthritis (OA). Studies have shown a relationship between pain and food intake among overweight and obese patients with OA. Fortunately, obesity is the most modifiable risk factor for knee OA. Of course, pain management is crucial to reducing OA symptoms. But even that may have a nutrition connection: one systematic review found scientific evidence to support some specific nutritional interventions–including omega 3 fatty acids–to relieve symptoms among patients with OA. Studies also show various nutrient deficiencies, including vitamins C and D as well as selenium, contribute to OA.
  4. Autoimmune disease. NIH estimates that 23.5 million Americans have an autoimmune disease (compare that with cancer, which affects 13 million Americans). Over 80 autoimmune disorders exist, including Crohn’s disease, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and type 1 diabetes. Of course, genetic predisposition, environmental factors (including infections), and gut dysbiosis play major roles in autoimmune disease development. But increasingly, researchers believe adverse dietary changes over the past 50 years–including gluten intolerances, altered gut bacteria, and vitamin D deficiencies–also contribute to that increased rate of autoimmune diseases. Chief among those changes is our prevalent high-sugar, high-salt, processed-food heavy diet that paves the pathway for autoimmune diseases. Nutrient-poor diets only exacerbate that problem: evidence shows vitamin D, vitamin A, selenium, zinc, omega-3 fatty acids, probiotics, and flavanol deficiencies contribute to autoimmune diseases.
  5. Prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes affects 29.1 million Americans (that’s over 9% of the population) and paves the way for serious complications such as heart disease, blindness, kidney failure, and lower-extremity amputations. Diabetic neuropathic pain, a common diabetes complication and the most common form of neuropathic pain, affects over 90% of people with diabetes. Studies show increased musculoskeletal pain in patients with type 2 diabetes adversely impacts body mass index, quality of life, physical function, and physical activity abilities. The link between diabetes and nutrition is a fundamental one that should never be set aside.

Working with patients suffering these and other conditions, I’m often impressed how optimal nutrition becomes the needle-mover to alleviate pain and help people heal. So how can a PT incorporate these considerations into practice? Here are a few simple tactics you can use right now:

  1. Ask nutrition-related questions during your initial consultation. Simple things like “do you take a multivitamin” or “about how many vegetable servings do you eat a week” can help lead to gradual dietary tweaks that yield impressive results.
  2. Have your patients keep a 24-hour food diary. Beyond establishing adherence and accountability, asking patients to write down everything they eat for 24 hours provides insight to their daily eating habits. Once you have that insight, you can help them gradually improve those habits.
  3. Offer some simple information. Rather than impose a major dietary overhaul, ask patients to do things that don’t seem so overwhelming; for example, to increase their water intake, or eliminate processed foods and sugar.
  4. Create simple, attainable goals. Begin by allowing your patients to experience success in some way. You might ask a patient to lose 5 pounds over 3 weeks, or provide information about incorporating more omega-3 fats into their diet combined with their exercise program. These goals are doable, and they can provide your patient with the confidence to take on more challenging targets.
  5. Offer your patients other ways to access information on better nutrition. Providing your patients with collateral sources of information—a helpful blog post, or an engaging book on nutrition—helps to reinforce the idea that the benefits of what they’re doing are well-established, and that they’re not alone in their journey toward healthier living. During a subsequent visit, ask patients if they got anything out of what you shared. The more reliable, readable information they receive, the better the chances that they’ll begin to become genuinely interested in the topic themselves, and for the long run. Over time, I’ve even had a few patients recommend books and blogs to me. Refer patients to nutrition and dietary professionals when their needs exceed the professional scope and your personal scope of practice.

If you’ve incorporated nutritional screening and information into your practice, what did you find was the most challenging aspect? Did you see results when patients made those changes? Share your thoughts below.

Joe Tatta, PT, DPT, is a board-certified nutrition specialist and functional medicine practitioner who specializes in treating lifestyle-related musculoskeletal, metabolic, and autoimmune health issues. He is the creator of the Healing Pain Online Summit and The Healing Pain Podcast, and is the author of Heal Your Pain Now: A revolutionary program to reset your brain and body for a pain-free life by Da Capo Press. Learn more by visiting www.drjoetatta.com/apta.

AHSAA Prep Spotlight Week 3 of Playoffs

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*Wenonah’s Rogers Passes for 341 Yards, 4 TDs for the Dragons to Advance to Semifinals for First Time.*

MONTGOMERY – Wenonah High School junior quarterback Carlos Rogers picked a perfect time to shine.
The 6-foot, 180-pound signal caller led the Dragons of Coach Ronald Cheatham to a 49-21 win over previously unbeaten Scottsboro (12-1) last week to advance to the Class 5A semifinals of the AHSAA’s 61st annual state football playoffs. Rogers was 10-of-17 passing for 341 yards and four touchdowns and rushed for two more scores to grab the AHSAA Prep Playoff Spotlight for the quarterfinals.
Wenonah (10-2) travels to Briarwood Christian (12-1) Friday with the winner securing a spot in the 2016 Super 7 State Finals at Auburn’s Jordan-Hare Stadium Dec. 1.
Hoover (11-2) and defending champion McGill-Toolen Catholic (13-0) clinched Class 7A championship game berths last week and will open the Super 7 Wednesday, Nov. 30, at 7 p.m. in the first of seven state championship clashes.  Lee County and Vestavia Hills will play first at 3:30 p.m. Wednesday in the third annual AHSAA Special Olympics Alabama Unified Game.
Senior wide receiver Demond Brown caught four of Rogers’ completions for 101 yards and three TDs, and senior running back Telvin Miller gained 173 yards on 30 rush attempts while scoring one TD.
“All week Coach said we were playing a good team that hasn’t been beaten,” Rogers told al.com reporter Anton Williams. “So when we got the ball, we just wanted to score on every possession.  Through the week (Coach Cheatham) told us we could (win).”
Wenonah finished with 537 total yards, did not punt and did not commit a turnover. Rogers’ touchdown passes covered 22, 24 and 26 yards to Brown, and 31 yards to Anthony Hudson. Rogers sneaked in from the 1 on both his scores. The Dragons’ defense did the rest limiting Scottsboro’s strong offense to just 29 yards passing. Senior DeKarlos Billingsley led the Wildcats of Coach Pat Nix with 179 yards rushing on 27 carries and scored three TDs on runs of 63, 15 and 4 yards.
The trip to the football semifinals is the first in Wenonah school history. Cheatham, 158-128 in 28 seasons as head coach, led the Dragons to a 6-1 record and second-place finish in Region 5 this season. Briarwood won the region title beating Wenonah 15-14 at Wenonah in the regular season to finish 7-0.
The Lions, coached by Fred Yancey, beat Mortimer Jordan 15-0 last week to advance to the semis for the first time since 2011. Yancey, 255-90 in 27 seasons at Briarwood and 296-110-1 overall, guided his team to state 3A titles in 1998 and 1999 and the 5A crown in 2003. Briarwood has finished runner-up three times (2004, 22007 and most recently (2010).
Rogers’ Spotlight performance edged out two strong efforts by Kadarius Toney of Blount and Garrett Sanders of G.W. Long. Toney, a University of Florida commitment and member of the Alabama All-Stars set to play Mississippi in the 30th meeting of the Classic Dec. 10, passed for 493 yards and five touchdowns and ran for 108 yards and two more scores as Blount fell 54-51 to Park Crossing in the 6A quarterfinals. His 601 total yards ranks second behind AHSAA state record-holder Jack Poundstone’s 614 yards for Trinity Presbyterian against Cordova in the 2008 state playoffs. The 493 yards passing is 10th best in AHSAA history.
Sanders accounted for 338 all-purpose yards and scored six touchdowns – four different ways –as the Rebels (12-0) beat Southern Choctaw 42-14 in the Class 2A state playoffs. He rushed for 190 yards on 30 carries with three rushing touchdowns on runs of 24, 11 and 2 yards, caught a 68-yard touchdown pass fromDylan Register, returned a kickoff 80 yards for a score and raced 52 yards with an interception on defense another TD. He was also a perfect 6-of-6 on point-after kicks to account for all 42 of G.W. Long’s points.

MILESTONE
    McKEEN BREAKS STATE RECORD: Briarwood Christian senior swimmer Sadler McKeen swam a 4:27.05 in the 500-yard style race at the AHSAA Central Sectional meet at Birmingham’s CrossPlex to break the AHSAA state record (4:27.36) set in 2013 by Spain Park’s Will Freeman. Freeman is now a sophomore at Alabama.
The record set by McKeen, the only senior on the Lions’ team, was the first set in the AHSAA Sectional in state history. All previous records were set in the state meet. It was also the first to be set in the 1A-5A divisions. In previous years, all swimmers competed in the same division.
ALABAMA ALL-STAR TEAM WATCH:
BUBBA THOMPSON, McGILL-TOOLEN CATHOLIC: The senior quarterback passed for 366 yards and four TDs and also scored the go-ahead TD as the defending state champion Yellow Jackets (13-0) advanced to the Super 7 Class 7A state finals for the second year in a row with a 35-21 win over Central-Phenix City. Thompson is one of two quarterbacks selected for the 30th annual Alabama-Mississippi All-Star football game at Cramton Bowl, Dec. 10.
MARLON WILLIAMS, McGILL-TOOLEN CATHOLIC: Had seven catches for 141 yards and two scores in McGill’s semifinal win over Central-Phenix City. His 59-yard TD reception sealed the victory late in the fourth quarter. Like Thompson, he is also a member of the Alabama All-Star Team set to play Mississippi’s all-stars Dec. 10.
CHADARIUS TOWNSEND, TANNER: Was 11-of-20 passing for 294 yards and four touchdowns in a 48-42 Class 2A loss to Lanett. Townsend was selected as a defensive back for the Alabama All-Stars.

Other top performances reported included:

RUSHING
LA’DAMIAN WEBB, BEAUREGARD: Rushed for 190 yards on 22 carries and scored six touchdowns as the Hornets (11-1) moved into the Class 5A semifinals with a 56-21 win over previously unbeaten Carroll (12-1). Webb’s scoring runs covered 20, 16, 36, 3, 11 and 29 yards. He heads into Friday’s semifinal battle at Jackson with 2,581 yards rushing on 219 carries with 40 rushing touchdowns. He has 45 TDs overall.
DILAN KILPATRICK, FYFFE: Ran for 310 yards and six touchdowns on 25 carries as the undefeated Red Devils (13-0) downed LaFayette 53-20 in the Class 2A quarterfinals to hand the Bulldogs ( 12-1) their first loss.
DEQUAN CHARLESTON, LINDEN: Scored five touchdowns on just eight touches as unbeaten Linden (13-0) beat previously unbeaten Georgiana (12-1) in the Class 1A quarterfinals 52-12. Charleston rushed for 140 yards and three TDs on six carries, caught a 17-yard TD pass and returned a punt 48 yards for his fifth score. Charleston also intercepted a Panthers pass to set up one of his touchdowns.
DARRIAN MEADS, HOKES BLUFF: Rushed 26 times for 194 yards and caught a 33-yard touchdown pass as the Eagles reached the state semifinals for the first time since 2004 with a 28-21 Class 4A comeback win over Cherokee County.

LEE STANLEY, PIEDMONT: Gained 170 yards on 11 carries, including a 51-yard touchdown in the first half, AS Bulldogs (13-0) beat Weaver 52-28 in the Class 3A quarterfinals.
WELDRIN FORD, OPELIKA: Had 32 carries for 153 yards and two touchdowns as Opelika knocked off defending Class 6A state champion Spanish Fort 21-17.
ANTONIO ROBINSON, AUSTIN: Rushed for 124 yards and two touchdowns in a 27-21 Class 6A third-round win over Muscle Shoals. He also converted two key third downs to help the Black Bears (10-3) run out the clock to seal the win.
TYLER ABSTON, JACKSON: Ran for 108 yards on eight carries as Class 5A, Region 1 third seed Jackson knocked off Region 1 top seed and defending state champion St. Paul’s Episcopal 35-9 in the 5A quarterfinals. He scored on a 51-yard run and had a 40-yard gain to set up the Aggies’ first score.
DEE WILLIAMS, ELBA: Rushed for four touchdowns and 110 yards in the defending state champion Tigers’ 52-44 Class 2A loss to Aliceville.

PASSING
TRE STORY, LANETT: Completed 13-of-18 passes for 287 yards and three touchdowns as the Panthers (11-2) downed Tarrant 48-42 in the Class 2A quarterfinals.
LANDON JOHNSON, HOKES BLUFF: Completed 5-of-8 passes for 91 yards and two touchdowns, including the game-winning 6-yard scoring pass to Braydon Hill early in the fourth quarter and scored a TD in a 28-21 Class 4A victory over Cherokee County. He also and made an interception on defense with 1:17 left to seal the win as the Eagles.
TYREN DUPREE, CHEROKEE COUNTY: Rushed for 98 yards on 13 carries and two touchdowns, including a 54-yard score on just the third play of the game. He also completed 5-of-10 pass attempts for 85 yards before suffering an ankle injury in the third quarter of the Warriors’ 28-21 Class 4A loss to Hokes Bluff.


PASS RECEIVING
C.J. YARBROUGH, TANNER: Had four catches for 132 yards and three scores as the Rattlers lost to Lanett 48-42 in the 2A playoffs.
QUARTEZ HENDERSON, CHEROKEE COUNTY: Caught five passes for 101 yards, including a 49-yard touchdown, in the Warriors’ 28-21 Class 4A loss to Hokes Bluff.

TAYLOR HAYES, PIEDMONT: Fired three touchdown passes to Austin Brazier and ran for two more scores in the Bulldogs’ 52-28 Class 3A playoff victory over Weaver. Hayes finished the game rushing for 160 yards on 16 carries.

DEFENSE
KENDARIAN HANDY-HOLLY, JACKSON: Made two interceptions on defense and scored a rushing TD on offense in the Aggies’ 35-9 Class 5A playoff win over St. Paul’s Episcopal.

JAYSON EVANS, HOOVER: Recovered a Gadsden City fumble in the end zone for a TD right before the half to spark a 35-point rally as Hoover (11-2) downed the Titans 42-14 in the Class 7A semifinals to earn a berth in the Class 7A state finals Nov. 30.
HOLT WATSON, G.W. LONG: Intercepted two passes in the Rebels’ 42-14 Class 2A win over Southern Choctaw.

KAEDON JENKINS, PIEDMONT: Picked off a Weaver pass and returned it 89 yards for a touchdown in the Bulldogs’ 52-28 Class 3A playoff win over their Calhoun County rivals.
TROY YOUNG, MOBILE CHRISTIAN: Intercepted a pass and rushed for two first-quarter TDs as the Leopards (12-1) advanced to the 3A semifinals with a 44-12 win over Oakman.

SPECIAL TEAMS
JAKE LANE, PARK CROSSING: Booted a 41-yard field goal as time expired to lift Park Crossing (13-0) to a 54-51 win over Blount. The win sends the Thunderbirds into the Class 6A semifinals for the first time. Lane, who had four field goals on the night, 41, 24, 26 and his final 41-yard kick. It also marked the second time he has had a game-winning field goal in the last five games for Coach Smitty Grider’s team.
MAURICE GOODMAN, WEAVER: Ran back the opening kickoff 90 yards for a touchdown to put the Bearcats up 7-0 in Weaver’s 52-28 Class 3A loss at Piedmont.

DEVORIAN WILKERSON, ELBA: Returned a kickoff 90 yards for a touchdown during Elba’s 52-44 Class 2A loss to Aliceville.

Pediatric Physical Therapy: Specialized Services and Treatments for Children Under 18.

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“Doctors often recommend Pediatric Physical Therapy for children and teens who have been injured or who have movement problems from an illness, disease, or disability. Physical therapists work to decrease pain and help the child return to their daily activities. They also teach children exercises designed to help them regain strength and range of motion, and also show them and families how to prevent future injuries.” (Kids Health,  June 2014).

Doctors will often recommend PT for children with:

    • Cerebral Palsy
    • Spinal Cord Injuries
    • Traumatic Brain Injuries
    • Spina Bifida
    • Brachial Plexopathy
    • Pediatric Cancer
    • Socialization Skills
    • Autism Spectrum Disorder
    • Developmental Delay
    • Down Syndrome
    • Feeding Problems
    • Fetal Alcohol Syndrome
    • Gait Abnormalities
    • Hydrocephalus Muscular Dystrophy
    • Pediatric Medical Syndromes
    • Pediatric Neurologic Disorders
    • Premature Birth
    • Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis
    • Seizure Disorders
    • Sensory Processing Difficulty
    • Torticollis/Plagiocephaly
    • Vision/Hearing Deficits
    • Sports Injuries

Advanced Specialization Training

  • Astronaut Training Protocol
  • Beckman Oral Motor Program
  • Contemporary Neurodevelopmental Treatment
  • Sequential-Oral-Sensory Approach to Feeding Program
  • Comprehensive Program in Sensory Integration including Administration of Sensory Integration & Praxis Test (SIPT)
  • VitalStim

What Pediatric Physical Therapists Do

At our two Pediatric Therapy Clinics located in Ocean Springs and Pascagoula MS, our therapists use a variety of treatments to help build strength, improve movement, and strengthen skills needed to complete daily activities.

Physical Therapy

  • Gross Motor Development/ Conditioning Activities
  • Neuromuscular Retraining Aquatic Therapy
  • Movement Skills/ Function
  • Balance/ Gait Training
  • Coordination Skills
  • Standardized Testing of Motor Abilities
  • Assistance with Positioning & Mobility Equipment
  • Orthotic Recommendations
  • Power Wheelchair Assessment & Training

Speech-Language Therapy

  • Language Therapy
  • Articulation Therapy
  • Dysphagia Therapy
  • Oral Motor Therapy
  • Assistive Technology
  • Fluency and Voice Therapy

Occupational Therapy

  • Handwriting & Fine Motor Skill Training
  • Assistance with Activities of Daily Living
  • Sensory Integration Therapy
  • Aquatic Therapy
  • Custom Splinting for Neurologic Conditions
  • Cognitive Retraining
  • Constraint Casting & Treatment
  • Neuromuscular Retraining
  • Training with Adaptive Equipment
  • Standardized Testing of Motor Abilities

Two of our Locations that offer all of the specialized Pediatric Therapy Treatments and Services are located below:

Ocean Springs Pediatric Rehab

#2 Doctor’s Drive  Ocean Springs, MS 39564

Phone: (228) 818-1211  •  Fax: (228) 818-1213

Pascagoula Medical Park

3101 Denny Ave, Suite 120,  Pascagoula, MS 39568

Phone: (228) 471-1520  •  Fax: (228) 471-1525

Encore Rehabilitation of Cullman

1701 Main Ave SW  Cullman, AL 35055
Phone: (256) 775-3737

Tomorrow is World Stroke Day.

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World Stroke Day is October 29th!

Nothing is more important than a life. If you spot the warning signs of stroke, call 911 right away. Responding quickly can be the difference between recovery and disability, or even death. Luckily stroke is largely treatable when you know the signs and act fast. Learn more here

Heart disease remains a leading cause of death among women. Prevention and cure of heart disease, stroke and its risk factors can be attained through regular physical activity and nutrition. Learn about the American Heart Association and Macy’s #GoRedGetFit Facebook challenge at GoRedForWomen.org/GoRedGetFit as a tool to support women’s heart and brain health.

Do You Know What F.A.S.T. Stands For?

Stroke can’t wait and neither should you. Stroke is largely treatable, but responding quickly when a stroke occurs can mean the difference between recovery and disability. Our Together to End Stroke initiative, nationally sponsored by Medtronic, teaches the acronym F.A.S.T. to help people remember common stroke warning signs and what to do if you spot a stroke. F.A.S.T. stands for: (F)ace drooping, (A)rm weakness, (S)peech difficulty, (T)ime to call 9-1-1.

 

Healthy For Good

Healthy For Good is a movement of everyday Americans everywhere who are making a commitment to their health. Here, we take our health seriously, one step at a time. Join the Healthy For Good revolution and we’ll keep you on track with encouragement, resources and humor along the way!

You Make the Difference

Your donation helps us better serve diverse populations and disadvantaged communities with lifesaving health information. Click here to give today. Help us achieve health equity.

National Physical Therapy Month- #ChoosePT

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October is National Physical Therapy Month and we want to recognize, and thank, all the Physical Therapists that work for our company! We are proud to be the largest privately owned provider of physical therapy throughout Alabama and Mississippi and we love to see our patients succeed through their therapy treatments.

As we recognize all of our wonderful therapists during National Physical Therapy Month, we also want to promote the #ChoosePT campaign. APTA has launched this awareness campaign about the growing toll of the opioid epidemic and has also provided the safety and effectiveness of physical therapy for pain management.

Physical therapy has been identified as a safe and effective alternative to opioids for long-term pain management and prevention by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the US Surgeon General. Physical therapists (PTs) and physical therapist assistants (PTAs) have a responsibility to understand the full scope of the epidemic and its potential impact on their patients and clients.”

No one wants to live in pain- and we don’t want you to. Choose Physical Therapy for Safe Pain Management.  Don’t just mask the pain. Treat it!

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Our therapists from the Ocean Springs Neurological Vestibular Rehabilitation Clinic in Mississippi are actively involved with the #ChoosePT movement and want to encourage you to be a part too. #SayNoToOpioids
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2014 Decatur Dragon Boat Races

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Dragon Boat Race & Festival

Join us for the Decatur Dragon Boat Race & Festival, May 10th at Point Mallard Aquatic Center Beach! This will be family-friendly, all day event you don’t want to miss! Proceeds go to The Decatur Morgan Hospital Foundation, a 501(c)3 organization providing financial support to the programs and services of Decatur Morgan Hospital.

“Dragon boat racing is the one of the fastest growing sports in the world and the most fun, unique cultural event featuring adrenaline-pumping action. Teams of 20 paddlers, a drummer and steerer race in authentic, 46-foot-long dragon boats. All ages, skill levels and physiques can paddle, making it the ultimate team building sport, requiring synchronicity and finesse, more than power to win.”

So bring your folding chair, a blanket and some sunscreen and enjoy the races! We hope to see you there!

The deadline to register for a dragon boat team is April 28th! Sign up here: http://www.decaturdragonboat.org

Family, Friends, & Fitness

Written by:

Adam Powell, DPT and Steve Milliron PT, ATC

Encore Sports Medicine – Hoover, AL

“There are three important factors that help shape your life.  Family, friends, and fitness have an enormous impact on your well-being.  These facets can provide encouragement, confidence, and self-esteem.  Your most joyous occasions are made exceptional when you are healthy and surrounded by loved ones.  These pillars shape us mentally, physically, and emotionally.  Your family, friends, and fitness are integral pieces to your health.

We acquire habits and beliefs from our parents, siblings, and close friends.   You are much more likely to perform daily exercise if you surround yourself with individuals that share the same goals.   Recreational activities are vital to your mental and physical health.  They provide an escape and release from the stress and monotony of your everyday life.

Everyone agrees that the most difficult aspect of exercise is getting started.  You have to maintain the motivation to make it a habit.  In these instances, it is helpful to draw from the support of your companions.  You have the opportunity to positively influence the health of your loved ones.  We all should provide support to our loved ones that are experiencing difficulty in becoming physically fit.

A regular daily exercise routine will change your life.  It will provide you a sense of accomplishment and will result in improved self-worth.  Exercise gives us an opportunity to achieve goals and track progress.  It is truly amazing how the human body improves itself through physical training.  Exercise will have a dramatically positive impact on a sedentary individual.

Your body becomes stronger, more flexible, and more tolerant by increasing your physical demands.  Everyday tasks will be accomplished with greater ease and efficiency when you are physically fit.  Both the young and the elderly will benefit from an exercise regimen.  It is important that you choose a form of physical activity that is both rewarding and fun.  You will not continue to participate in an exercise routine that you consider “very hard” or a “chore.”

Easy everyday activities are beneficial to your health.  Simply walking, whether in a group or alone, is an excellent form of exercise that can be performed indoors or outdoors.  Whether it is a quick walk around the block, or a long walk in the mall, walking is an effective tool that will improve your general well-being.   Walking with a group of neighbors, church members, significant others, etc. serves as a time for bonding and communication.  Walking alone provides a time for reflection and relaxation.

You may find that formal exercise classes are best suited to meet your needs.  Yoga, Pilates, Zumba, Tai Chi, Crossfit, step aerobics, and cycling groups have all become quite popular.  The social component to this form of exercise is what many find intriguing.  They enjoy this type of activity because they find that the utilization of an instructor improves their form and technique.  Group exercise is an excellent strategy to ensure your enthusiasm and adherence to a new routine.

Exercise can be quite intimidating to beginners.  You may be more comfortable receiving experienced direction from a qualified personal trainer or coach.  This is a way to achieve your goals if you desire one on one guidance and supervision.  Video workouts such as P90X, Insanity, etc. are great tools if you want the structure of a formal class but the freedom to perform your routine at any time or location.

Is summary, there are multiple forms of physical activity that will positively influence your life.  You must find an exercise routine that you enjoy.  You will positively impact the health of your friends and family by encouraging them to get active and stay active.

If you have any questions regarding starting your new exercise routine, please call (205) 682-7650 and talk with Steve Milliron, PT/ATC, Tim Sirmon, DPT, or Adam Powell, DPT.  They see patients daily at Encore Sports Medicine on 2801 John Hawkins Parkway on Hwy 150 in Hoover, AL.

Adam Powell and Steve Milliron helped put this article together.  Steve is a physical therapist and athletic trainer in the Hoover area over the last 20 years.  Adam is a recent graduate from UAB and licensed physical therapist for Encore Sports Medicine.  He is married and lives near Hoover. ”

*It is important to note that one should consult with their physician prior to starting a new exercise routine.