Ocean Springs Neuroscience Center

Chinese Medical Professionals visit Singing River Health System Facilities and Encore Rehabilitation-Mississippi-Part 4

Group of people posing for picture in front of a wall with football helmets mounted on the wall in the background

Medical Professionals from China visit with Encore Rehabilitation Physical Therapists at East Lake Physical Therapy and Sports Center.

After touring Encore Rehabilitation clinics in northern Alabama, visiting Medical Professionals from China continued their tour by visiting Encore Rehabilitation Physical, Occupational, and Speech Therapists working in the healthcare facilities of the Singing River Health System in the Gulf Coast area of Mississippi.

The use of Western rehabilitation practices such as physical therapy and occupational therapy is growing in China. The visitors were observing and learning how Western rehab is used in a variety of settings such as outpatient clinics, hospitals, industries, and sports settings.

Singing River Health System locations visited by the group included:

  • Ocean Springs Pediatrics Center
  • Ocean Springs Hospital
  • Ocean Springs Neuro Rehab Center
  • Gautier Physical Therapy and Industrial Center
  • East Lake Physical Therapy and Sports Center.

Singing River Health System is both a mission-driven provider of health services and one of the largest employers on the Mississippi Gulf Coast. Singing River provides critical health services, numerous community outreach programs, and charitable services and educational programs. Community-owned, Singing River is also home to the award-winning Blue Distinction Center of Excellence in cardiac care, stroke care, and spine and joint surgery.

Encore Rehabilitation is proud of our association with Singing River Health System, providing quality therapists and support staff in rehabilitative settings for Singing River. Encore Rehabilitation is the largest privately owned provider of rehabilitation services in the southeast United States. Encore has been serving communities in Alabama and Mississippi for over 35 years.

Group posing for photo inside the lobby of Ocean Springs Hospital, Ocean Springs, Mississippi
Ocean Springs Hospital Administrator Heath Thompson, center, along with representatives of Encore Rehabilitation, provided a tour of Ocean Springs Hospital to the visiting Chinese Medical Professionals.

Part 4 of a 5 part series.

Encore Rehabilitation, Inc.- Corporate Office
251 Johnston Street SE, Suite 200
Decatur, Alabama 35610
256-350-1764
Find Corporate Encore Rehabilitation on Facebook by clicking here

encorerehab.com 

At Encore Rehabilitation, we LOVE to see you move.


Part 5-Medical Professionals from China visit University of South Alabama Health System and Encore Rehabilitation-Tillman’s Corner, Alabama

Part 3- Chinese Medical Professionals visit Encore Rehabilitation-Corporate Office, Decatur, Alabama

Part 2- Chinese Medical Professionals visit Encore Rehabilitation-Hartselle

Part 1- Chinese Medical Professionals visit Encore Rehabilitation-Athens


MLB Bound-Jonathan Gettys- Athlete of the Month for Encore Rehabilitation-Dothan

Headache Relief- “I Feel Like a New Person!”

Physical Therapy instead of Knee Surgery – One patient’s success

Parkinson’s Fitness Class

We are happy to announce a group fitness class for anyone with Parkinson’s at Ocean Springs Neurological Vestibular Rehab,
every Thursday at 2 pm! We’ll see you there!

Parkinsons Fitness Class

Ocean Springs Neurological Vestibular Rehab
3603 Bienville Boulevard
Ocean Springs, Mississippi 39564
Register at 228-875-5050

encorerehab.com

 

Multiple Sclerosis Awareness Month

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  • Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an abnormal response of the body’s immune system  against the central nervous system (brain, spinal cord, and optical nerves). It affects the flow of information in the brain and between the brain and the rest of the body.
  • Anyone may develop MS.
  • 2-3 times more women than men develop MS.
  • MS is not contagious or directly inherited.
  • More than 2.3 million people are affected by MS worldwide.
  • MS symptoms occur when the immune-system produces inflammation within the CNS.  The inflammatory attack damages myelin, (the protective insulation surrounding nerve fibers), oligodendrocytes (cells that make CNS myelin) and sometimes the underlying nerve fiber.
  • Common MS symptoms include: fatigue; vision problems/ ringing/numbness; vertigo/dizziness; muscle weakness; balance/coordination problems; walking difficulties; speech and swallowing problems; bladder/bowel problems; cognitive difficulties; emotional changes; sexual dysfunction; and mood swings/depression.
  • The damage caused by inflammation can produce symptoms that resolve over weeks to months or symptoms that are permanent.
  • MS does not always cause paralysis. The majority of people with MS do not become severely disabled. Two-thirds of people who have MS remain able to walk, though many will need an aid, such as a cane or crutches.
  • Environmental factors, such as low Vitamin D and cigarette smoking have been shown to increase the risk of MS.
  • MS occurs in most ethnic groups but is most common in Caucasians of northern European ancestry.
  • Managing MS is an ongoing process, beginning with the very first symptoms and continuing throughout the disease course. It’s never too soon or too late to think about how to access high quality, comprehensive, interdisciplinary care.  **

    At Encore Rehabilitation, our team of Physical, Occupational,
    and Speech Therapists can help patients with MS
    to ease many of your symptoms and move, think, and feel better.

    If you are one of the estimated 2.5 million people
    diagnosed with MS, ask your doctor about
    rehabilitation with Encore or call us today.

    **Facts and Statistics from the National Multiple Sclerosis Society webpage. To find more information about Multiple Sclerosis on their website, click here.

 

Brain Injury Facts & Statistics-Brain Injury Awareness Month**

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  • Every nine seconds, someone in the US sustains a brain injury.
  • More than 3.5 million children and adults sustain an acquired brain injury (ABI) each year, but the total incidence is unknown.
  • Traumatic brain injury  (TBI) is a type of ABI. A TBI is caused by trauma to the brain from an external force.
  • One of every 60 people in the US lives with TBI-related disability
  • At least 5.3 million Americans live with a TBI-related disability
  • Typical causes of ABI include:
    • Electric Shock
    • Infectious Disease
    • Lightning Strike
    • Near Drowning
    • Oxygen Deprivation (Hypoxia/Anoxia)
    • Stroke
    • Seizure Disorder
    • Substance Abuse/Overdose
    • Toxic Exposure
    • Trauma
    • Tumor

        Call the Ocean Springs Neuroscience Center today at 228-818-1207 to set up an appointment for quality care with our Physical Therapists, Occupational Therapists, and Speech Therapists.  We are here to help you regain  your independence and improve your quality of life.

Ocean Springs Neurological Vestibular Rehabilitation
3603 Bienville Blvd., Suite 202
Ocean Springs, MS 39564
228-818-1207

For other Encore Rehabilitation locations near you, please visit our website at encorerehab.com

**Facts and Statistics from the Brain Injury Association of America. For a complete list of statistics, click here.

 

Risk of Lymphedema Following Cancer Interventions

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Lymphedema is an abnormal accumulation of protein and water that causes swelling, occurring most frequently in an arm or leg. Cancer interventions often damage portions of the lymphatic system and are the leading cause of lymphedema in the United States. The lymphatic system is a complex system made up of lymphatic fluid, lymph nodes, vessels, collectors, the spleen, and thymus. Its main functions are to drain substances that cannot be absorbed by the vascular system and also plays a role in your immune response.

Surgical procedures such a mastectomy, lumpectomy, or lymph node resection remove or damage lymph nodes in the affected region, decreasing your body’s ability to filter out this lymph fluid. Radiation treatment also poses a threat for lymphatic system damage. Since lymphatic vessels are mere millimeters beneath the surface of the skin, scar tissue formation along radiation treatment areas can impair lymphatic flow through these vessels. These cancer interventions compromise the lymphatic system which significantly increases the risk of developing lymphedema.

According to the Academy of Lymphatic Studies’, 50-75% of patients that have undergone a mastectomy secondary to breast cancer acquire lymphedema within 5 years. Any cancer that requires surgical intervention and/or radiation on or near the neck, armpit, or groin are also at an increased risk of developing lymphedema. Examples include the following: Breast, prostate, uterus, bladder, lymphoma, and melanoma. Although the majority of lymphedema diagnoses are secondary to cancer, lymphedema may also occur secondary a congenital malformation of the lymphatic system (primary lymphedema) or secondary to trauma, infection, malignant tumors, or chronic venous insufficiencies.

Early detection and management of lymphedema is key! Recognizing these early symptoms and talking with your doctor can ensure you receive proper lymphedema treatment and obtain adequate education and tools needed to manage your diagnosis.

Early signs and symptoms of lymphedema include the following and may come and go at first:

  • Swelling in all or part of the affected region – pressing on the skin with your finger may leave an indentation, which is called pitting edema
  • Abnormal feeling in the extremity, such as tingling, numbness, tight feeling, heavy felling, or just that something doesn’t feel right
  • Rings or clothing fitting differently
  • Veins or tendons harder to distinguish

Regardless of whether lymphedema was caused by cancer interventions or by another source, it is important to know that there are trained therapists nearby that can assist you in understanding your diagnosis. The current gold standard for lymphedema treatment is Complete Decongestive Therapy (CDT) which consists of manual lymphatic drainage (MLD), compression bandage application, decongestive exercises, and skin care. Treatment for lymphedema is available at many Encore Rehab locations. For a complete listing of Encore Rehabilitation clinics, please visit our website at encorerehab.com .

For additional information, please come to one of our free educational meetings held on the 3rdWednesday of each month on the 2nd floor of the Neuroscience Center in Ocean Springs, Mississippi (building right next door to the Cancer Center) or contact one of our Encore Rehab clinics.

This article was written by Jaime Garrett, MS, OTR/L for Encore Rehabilitation in Ocean Springs, Mississippi. 

Ocean Springs Neurological Vestibular Rehabilitation
3603 Bienville Blvd., Suite 200, Ocean Springs, MS 39564
228-818-1207

 

Exercise May Improve Memory

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For many Americans, January is a time to set goals concerning exercise for weight loss and heart health. Now there may be one more reason to exercise – to improve memory.

According to a study by the Mayo Clinic, a new guideline for medical practitioners recommends twice-weekly exercise for people with mild cognitive impairment to improve memory and thinking.

“Regular physical exercise has long been shown to have heart health benefits, and now we can say exercise also may help improve memory for people with mild cognitive impairment,” says Ronald Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., lead author, director of the Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center, Mayo Clinic, and the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging. “What’s good for your heart can be good for your brain.” Dr. Petersen is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research.

Petersen defines mild cognitive impairment as “an intermediate stage between the expected cognitive decline of normal aging and the more serious decline of dementia. Symptoms can involve problems with memory, language, thinking and judgment that are greater than normal age-related changes.”

Read the complete article here:  https://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/discussion/new-guideline-try-exercise-to-improve-memory-thinking/

 

A very Merry Christmas Celebration at Adult Neuro Center

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The Adult Neuroscience Center (Ocean Springs, Mississippi) held its Annual Support Group Christmas Party on Friday, December 15th for members of the four support groups offered at our clinic.  These groups include the Parkinson’s Disease Support Group, the Aphasia & Communication Support Group, the Movement Disorder Exercise Group, and the Stroke Support Group.  Good times and laughter were shared by all who attended!

For further information regarding when/where these groups meet, please call our Ocean Springs Office at (228)-818-1207.

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Ocean Springs Neurological Vestibular Rehabilitation
3603 Bienville Boulevard, Suite 200
Ocean Springs, MS 39564
228-818-1207
Find Ocean Springs Neurological Vestibular Rehabilitation on Facebook by clicking here

encorerehab.com

“Recovery After Stroke: Coping with Emotions” via National Stroke Association.

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*The complete article can be found here.

Dealing with a flood of emotions can be hard for stroke survivors. Some emotions are normal responses to the changes in your life after stroke. Others are common but should not be considered a normal part of stroke recovery. If you suffer from depression, anxiety or emotions that are not in line with the occasion, seek help.

Dealing with Depression

Grieving for what you have lost is good for you. But when sadness turns to depression, it’s time to act. Depression can take hold right after a stroke, during rehabilitation (rehab) or after you go home. It can be – but not always – caused by brain damage from the stroke. Mild or major, it is the most common emotional problem faced by survivors.

Your treatment may include counseling, medicine or both.

Depression symptoms include:

  •  Feeling sad or “empty” most of the time
  •  Loss of interest or pleasure in ordinary activities
  •  Fatigue or feeling “slowed down”
  •  Sudden trouble sleeping or oversleeping
  •  Sudden loss of appetite or weight gain
  •  Being unable to concentrate, remember or make decisions like you used to
  •  Feeling worthless or helpless
  •  Feelings of guilt
  •  Ongoing thoughts of death or suicide, suicide planning or attempts
  • A sudden change in how easily you are annoyed  Crying all the time

    Some useful tips:

     Make the most of rehab; the more you recover, the better you will feel

    Spend time with family and friends

     Maintain your quality of life by staying active and doing things you enjoy

     Seek help soon after you note symptom

Having Extreme Anxiety

Anxiety is an overwhelming sense of worry or fear. It can include increased sweating or heart rate. Among stroke survivors, feelings of anxiety are common. Often, stroke survivors suffer from both depression and anxiety at the same time.

Anxiety can affect rehab progress, daily living, relationships and quality of life. So, be sure to seek help right away.

Anxiety symptoms include:

  •   Ongoing worrying, fear, restlessness and irritability that don’t seem to let up
  •   Low energy
  •   Poor concentration
  •   Muscle tension
  •   Feeling panicky and out of breath
  •   Scary rapid heart beat
  •   Shaking
  •   Headache
  •   Feeling sick to your stomach

    Again, treatment may include counseling, medicine or both.

Uncontrolled Emotions

Do you find yourself laughing or crying at all the wrong times? If so, you may suffer from Pseudobulbar Affect (PBA). Also called emotional incontinence or pathologic lability, PBA is a common medical problem among stroke survivors. It can cause you to laugh at a funeral or cry at a comedy club. It can even make you cry uncontrollably for little or no reason. For this, it is often confused with depression. But, PBA is not depression.

People with PBA are unable to control their emotional expressions the way they used to. When this happens in social settings, they feel embarrassed, frustrated and angry. They also sense that others are uneasy. They may avoid work, public places and family get-togethers. This can lead to feelings of fear, shame and isolation.

There is no treatment approved by the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) for PBA, though antidepressant drugs can help.

These things may help you cope with PBA:

  •  Be open about it. Warn people that you cannot always control your emotions.
  • Explain that the emotions you show on the outside don’t always reflect how you feel on the inside.
  •  Distract yourself. If you feel an outburst coming on, focus on something boring or unrelated. Try counting the number of items on a shelf.
  •   Note the posture you take when crying. When you think you are about to cry, change your posture.
  •   Breathe in and out slowly until you are in control.
  •   Relax your forehead, shoulders and other muscles that tense up when crying.

    What Can Help

  •   Ask your doctor about emotional changes and symptoms early on.
  •   Ask your family to stimulate your interest in people and social activities.
  •   Stay as active as possible and stay involved in your hobbies.
  •   Set goals and measure accomplishment.
  •   Plan daily activities to provide structure and sense of purpose.
  • Stay involved with people, thoughts and activities that you enjoy.

    Get information on stroke recovery from National Stroke Association. Visit http://www.stroke.org or call 1- 800-STROKES (1-800-787- 6537).

    Contact your local stroke association. Join a stroke support group. Other survivors will understand your issues, and offer support and ideas to help you manage your emotions.

     

    Speak openly and honestly to your caregivers about your emotional changes. They’ll be glad you did, and together you can work out a solution.

     

    Professionals Help:

     Psychologists, psychiatrists and other mental health professionals experienced with stroke-related emotional disorders.

     

    Rehabilitation is a lifetime commitment and an important part of recovering from a stroke. Through rehabilitation, you relearn basic skills such as talking, eating, dressing and walking. Rehabilitation can also improve your strength, flexibility and endurance. The goal is to regain as much independence as possible.

    Remember to ask your doctor, “Where am I on my stroke recovery journey?

Pediatric Physical Therapy: Specialized Services and Treatments for Children Under 18.

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“Doctors often recommend Pediatric Physical Therapy for children and teens who have been injured or who have movement problems from an illness, disease, or disability. Physical therapists work to decrease pain and help the child return to their daily activities. They also teach children exercises designed to help them regain strength and range of motion, and also show them and families how to prevent future injuries.” (Kids Health,  June 2014).

Doctors will often recommend PT for children with:

    • Cerebral Palsy
    • Spinal Cord Injuries
    • Traumatic Brain Injuries
    • Spina Bifida
    • Brachial Plexopathy
    • Pediatric Cancer
    • Socialization Skills
    • Autism Spectrum Disorder
    • Developmental Delay
    • Down Syndrome
    • Feeding Problems
    • Fetal Alcohol Syndrome
    • Gait Abnormalities
    • Hydrocephalus Muscular Dystrophy
    • Pediatric Medical Syndromes
    • Pediatric Neurologic Disorders
    • Premature Birth
    • Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis
    • Seizure Disorders
    • Sensory Processing Difficulty
    • Torticollis/Plagiocephaly
    • Vision/Hearing Deficits
    • Sports Injuries

Advanced Specialization Training

  • Astronaut Training Protocol
  • Beckman Oral Motor Program
  • Contemporary Neurodevelopmental Treatment
  • Sequential-Oral-Sensory Approach to Feeding Program
  • Comprehensive Program in Sensory Integration including Administration of Sensory Integration & Praxis Test (SIPT)
  • VitalStim

What Pediatric Physical Therapists Do

At our two Pediatric Therapy Clinics located in Ocean Springs and Pascagoula MS, our therapists use a variety of treatments to help build strength, improve movement, and strengthen skills needed to complete daily activities.

Physical Therapy

  • Gross Motor Development/ Conditioning Activities
  • Neuromuscular Retraining Aquatic Therapy
  • Movement Skills/ Function
  • Balance/ Gait Training
  • Coordination Skills
  • Standardized Testing of Motor Abilities
  • Assistance with Positioning & Mobility Equipment
  • Orthotic Recommendations
  • Power Wheelchair Assessment & Training

Speech-Language Therapy

  • Language Therapy
  • Articulation Therapy
  • Dysphagia Therapy
  • Oral Motor Therapy
  • Assistive Technology
  • Fluency and Voice Therapy

Occupational Therapy

  • Handwriting & Fine Motor Skill Training
  • Assistance with Activities of Daily Living
  • Sensory Integration Therapy
  • Aquatic Therapy
  • Custom Splinting for Neurologic Conditions
  • Cognitive Retraining
  • Constraint Casting & Treatment
  • Neuromuscular Retraining
  • Training with Adaptive Equipment
  • Standardized Testing of Motor Abilities

Two of our Locations that offer all of the specialized Pediatric Therapy Treatments and Services are located below:

Ocean Springs Pediatric Rehab

#2 Doctor’s Drive  Ocean Springs, MS 39564

Phone: (228) 818-1211  •  Fax: (228) 818-1213

Pascagoula Medical Park

3101 Denny Ave, Suite 120,  Pascagoula, MS 39568

Phone: (228) 471-1520  •  Fax: (228) 471-1525

Encore Rehabilitation of Cullman

1701 Main Ave SW  Cullman, AL 35055
Phone: (256) 775-3737

From Feeding Tube to Eating by Mouth: Mr. Lee’s Amazing Success Story

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Speech Therapy at Ocean Springs Neuroscience Center for Dysphagia Treatment

Therapist: Stephanie Stensland MS, CCC-SLP

From Feeding Tube to Eating by Mouth

Mr. Lee’s Success Story:

After jaw reconstruction in July of 2015, Mr. Lee experienced a paralyzed vocal fold and an immobile epiglottis, causing him to aspirate and need a PEG feeding tube for 100% of his nutrition. He was no longer able to eat or drink anything by mouth. He started outpatient therapy October 1, 2015, at the Neuroscience Center to regain his swallow. Mr. Lee went in for another swallow study soon after beginning outpatient therapy and although his epiglottis had begun to partially move, he was still at high risk for aspiration. He was given home swallowing exercises that he did several times a day and began small trials of water using the Frazier Free Water Protocol. As his swallow reflex became faster and he began to demonstrate better hyolaryngeal excursion, we advanced his intake to purees such as pudding with strict swallowing strategies.

Mr. Lee utilized a multi-step strategy to reduce his risk of aspiration which involved using 1) a left head turn to close off the paralyzed vocal fold, 2) a breath hold to help adduct his working vocal fold, 3) a very small bite of a pureed consistency, 4) use a quick and effortful swallow followed by an immediate cough and 5) another swallow and cough. It was a lot of steps, but it allowed him to eat something by mouth. Over the next several weeks Mr. Lee regained strength and his swallow function through continuous exercises, use of neuromuscular electrical stimulation, manual therapy and therapeutic trials of purees and soft solids. Mr. Lee eventually began eating soft whole food and thin liquids with fewer swallowing strategies as he gained strength and function. Around mid-November, we eliminated swallowing strategies and allowed soft solids and thin liquids at home with use of aspiration precautions. Towards the end of November, he was able to meet nearly all nutritional needs by mouth. Once he was able to demonstrate a nutritive swallow without reports of pharyngeal residue, we began addressing his trismus (incomplete jaw opening) with the use of an OraStretch device.

His hours of home exercises and therapy paid off when he returned to Ochsner on January 18, 2016 to have his PEG tube removed! We are proud to report that Mr. Lee is now discharged from speech therapy and is enjoying meals with his family and friends at home and in restaurants.

Mr. Lee’s perspective:

What was eye opening to you about your experience with head and neck cancer and swallowing disorders?

“I was surprised at how long it took to get it all back. I thought I would be swallowing normally a month after my surgery in July of 2015 and that was not the case.”

What do you think helped you the most throughout your journey from being NPO to eating again?

“A combination of sound instruction and recommendations from great doctors, home health therapy, outpatient therapy and family encouragement.”

What would you consider your turning point?

“When I was able to eat Thanksgiving food with my family…in fact I ate three quarters of a pecan pie the week of Thanksgiving. Also, when I took my first bite of a steak. It was great!”