summer

Grill Time with the Oak Grove Warriors!

End of Summer Workouts Meal for the Oak Grove (Ms.) Warriors showing Asst. Football Coach Mitchell, Athletic Trainer Sam Morris, and Head Football Coach Drew Causey.

End of Summer Workouts Meal for the Oak Grove (Ms.) Warriors showing Asst. Football Coach Mitchell, Athletic Trainer Sam Morris, and Head Football Coach Drew Causey.

The Oak Grove Warriors (Mississippi) enjoyed a great End of Summer Workouts Meal as Athletic Trainer Sam Morris grilled out for the team! What a wonderful tradition!

Encore Rehabilitation-Oak Grove would like to wish the Warriors the best of success in the upcoming 2018 football season!

Encore Rehabilitation-Oak Grove
5266 Old Highway 11, Suite 130
Hattiesburg, Mississippi  39402
601-268-0208
Find Encore Rehabilitation-Oak Grove on Facebook by clicking here

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Monday Motivation – July 23, 2018

Graphic with pineapple that reads Be so good they can't ignore you-Steve Martin. encorerehab.com

Athletes: How to get the most out of Summer Training.

“No more pencils, No more books, No more teacher’s dirty looks… School’s out for summer”

Written by Encore MS, ATC/LAT, Eric Oehms. 6/5/2015.

Summer used to be a time to slow down. There were no 7 on 7 tournaments, travel baseball and softball teams did not exist, and AAU’s primary focus was to get players from many different sports ready for the international play and the Olympics. But for athletes today, summer is time to focus on honing your athletic skills, improving your strength, speed, endurance, and preparing your body for the upcoming seasons.  Because one thing is sure; right now, your opponent is getting better in order to beat you.

Are you doing the things you are supposed to do?

Staying hydrated is always important especially in the summertime heat.  It’s important to weigh before and after every workout and consume 2-3 cups of water or sports drink for every pound lost during exercise.  Water is great but if you are exercising for long periods of time, consuming a sports drink within 30 minutes after the workout will benefit you more due to the added carbs in the sports drink.  Make sure you are checking your urine color for hydration status.  Remember, you want it to look like lemonade, not apple juice.

Proper nutrition is key if you want to get the most out of your time spent in the weight room.  Timing your snacks or meals is an important part of the equation.

– 3 hours prior to a workout or competition is the ideal time to eat a meal, however that is not always possible.  If your workout is in the early morning, make sure you wake up in time to eat something.

– If you only have 30 minutes to an hour before a workout, keep it light with a granola bar/sports bar and a sports drink.  If you have 1-2 hours prior to your workout, your breakfast should consist of fruit, whole grain toast or bagel with a little peanut butter, and 16 ounces of water or sports drink.  Stay away from sugary cereals, whole milk, and high fat meats.

One of the most overlooked components of your plan should be getting the proper amount of sleep.  Studies have shown that athletes who get 9.5 hours of sleep per night have improved proprioception (sense of body position) and reduced injury rates.  If you find it difficult to fall asleep, lower the light level in your house or room 30-60 minutes prior to going to bed.  Also, put a curfew on your technology.  Make a decision to put your gadgets away and stop checking social media by 9pm.

Make no mistake; summer should be some of the best times of your life.  Spending summer with family and friends and enjoying time away from class are some of my best childhood memories.  However, you can still enjoy your summer while preparing your body for the season ahead.  But it takes planning and commitment , something today’s athlete should already be accustomed to doing.

 

“10 easy tips for eating healthy while on the road or on vacation this summer.” by AL.com

Laura Newton, an assistant professor in the Department of Nutrition Sciences at The University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), offers these 10 suggestions:

Plan ahead: “Choose foods to take in the car, eat before arriving at the airport and consider the options available upon arrival at the destination,” Newton said in a UAB news release this week.

Keep it on ice: Put a cooler in the car and pack it with such healthy treats as fruit, yogurt, water, cut-up vegetables and sandwiches on whole-grain bread.

Eat this, not that: Make the best food choices you can when you’re on the road. At convenience stores, go for yogurt, fresh fruit, fruit cups or nuts (which are good in moderation.) At burger joints, the most simply prepared items are the healthiest choices, according to Newton. She suggests a plain hamburger with lettuce and tomatoes or a grilled chicken sandwich with lettuce and tomatoes. You can also hold the mayo and dressing and choose kid-size portions.

Don’t eat out all the time: If possible, rent a hotel room or vacation home with a refrigerator and stock it with good food. “It can be easier to eat healthful meals when cooking yourself,” Newton said.

Moderation, moderation: Try not to miss meals, because this can cause you to overeat at the next meal. “Pack a cooler for the beach and take water, fruit, maybe some nuts and string cheese,” Newton said. “This type of mini-meal is easily portable and can help tide people over until they can have a regular meal.”

Go ahead, be good to yourself: Don’t feel you have to completely give up favorite vacation foods. “You should definitely indulge, but in moderation, maybe one small treat a day or one splurge day during the week,” Newton said. “Ask for a small portion of the regional favorite or order from the appetizer menu.”

Start restaurant meals with salad or veggies: “This will help fill you up so you don’t eat more of a higher-calorie item,” Newton said. “Ask for extra vegetables or substitute another vegetable in place of a starch.”

Search the web: Look online for restaurants in the area you’re visiting. Review the menus in advance and decide what to eat before you go.

Drink lots of water: People often mistake dehydration for hunger, according to Newton.

Stay active! “This doesn’t need to be strenuous exercise, such as running or lifting weights, but do go sightseeing on foot or take a hike, swim in the pool or at the beach,” Newton said.”

Source: http://blog.al.com/spotnews/2014/05/post_1150.html