workout

Wrist Roll – Workout of the Week with SportsFit Leakesville

The often overlooked wrist muscles are the feature of this week’s Workout of the Week with SportsFit Leakesville!

Gym Director Stacy Eubanks shows us two ways to work the extensor and flexor muscles of the wrist through an exercise called Wrist Rolling.

If you have questions about strengthening your wrists or any other workout questions, come see us a SportsFit Leakesville! We LOVE to see you move!

#SportsFit
#EncoreRehab

SportsFit Leakesville
433 Main Street
Leakesville, Mississippi 39451
601-394-4545
Find SportsFit Leakesville on Facebook by clicking here

encorerehab.com

Battle Ropes: Workout of the Week with SportsFit Leakesville

4 ways to use the Battle Ropes in your workout!

Battle Ropes Exercises are this week’s Workout of the Week! Join SportsFit Leakesville Gym Director Stacy Eubanks as he demonstrates 4 basic ways to use the Battle Ropes in your workout routine!

If you have an exercise or piece of equipment you would like to Stacy to feature, please leave us a comment below.

We LOVE to see you move!

SportsFit Leakesville
433 Main Street
Leakesville, Mississippi 39451
601-394-4545
Find SportsFit Leakesville on Facebook by clicking here

encorerehab.com

Bicep Curl Exercise of the Week with SportsFit Leakesville

SportsFit Leakesville Exercise of the Week is the Bicep Curl on the Arm Curl Plate-loaded Machine!

Gym Director Stacy Eubanks gives us step-by-step instructions on how to a bicep curl using the machine.

Important steps include:
*Adjust the seat
*Adjust the weight
*Find the pivot point and align elbows
*Arms straight
*Handles straight
*Engage biceps and exercise – go slowly
*Be mindful of your breathing – Exhale going up; Inhale going down

We LOVE to see you move and would LOVE to answer your questions or help you set-up a personalized exercise routine! Come by the gym and see our trained and motivated staff!

SportsFit Leakesville
433 Main Street
Leakesville, Mississippi 39451
601-394-4545
Find SportsFit Leakesville on Facebook

encorerehab.com

SportsFit Leakesville Exercise of the Week: Stretching with a Foam Roller

SportsFit Leakesville Workout of the Week: Straight Leg Raises

SportsFit Leakesville Exercise of the Week: Stretching with a Foam Roller

Stretching before and after working out helps to prevent injuries and alleviate soreness. Remember to take time to stretch!

This week, SportsFit Leakesville Gym Manager Stacy Eubanks demonstrates how to use the foam roller for stretching. If you have questions about your fitness goals, how to use the equipment, or setting up a fitness routine, just ask! We’re here to help you!

Happy Thanksgiving!

SportsFit Leakesville
433 Main Street
Leakesville, Mississippi 39451
601-394-4545
Find SportsFit Leakesville on Facebook by clicking here

encorerehab.com

THE NO GYM WORKOUT: FIVE FUN ALTERNATIVES

 

“Are you looking for a no gym workout? We know hitting the gym can be a great thing. The benefits of a membership generally outweigh the negatives by a landslide. That being said, sometimes it can be difficult to get to the gym in the first place. Whether you’re traveling across the country or stuck inside during a snowstorm, there are some awesome exercise alternatives out there.  Seriously, if you can work out with a towel, you can work out anywhere.”

Here are five fun workouts you can complete whenever, wherever:

HIIT Hotel Workout from Anne Smiles

You don’t have to skip your workout if the hotel lacks a gym. Did you know you could complete a high intensity interval workout using just the bed? Bonus: you can take a nap right after you finish. View it here.

Paper Plate Workout from Fitful Focus

Don’t worry about having enough equipment. This lower body workout serves up some serious moves on basic paper plates. Hand towels work well, too, on wood or tile floors. View it here.

At Home Workout from The Fit Cookie

Why hit the gym when you can complete a quality workout right in your very own home? A few weights are a great investment and will help guarantee that you won’t miss the gym a bit. View it here.

The Chair Workout via Run Pretty

Pull up a chair and don’t just have a seat. When you can work out with a chair, you can work out anywhere. A park bench will work just as well, which means you can squeeze in a workout while the kids play. View it here. 

5-Minute Wakeup Workout from Food Faith Fitness

Start your day off on the right track with this quick bodyweight workout. It can also work well for a midday pick me up! We all know the afternoon slump is real, you guys. View it here.

What’s your go-to travel or at-home workout? Leave a comment and let us know!

 

 

**More of this article can be found at http://www.bumblebee.com/no-gym-workout-5-fun-exercise-alternatives/.

HOW TO IMPROVE YOUR POSTURE

You’re nailing your workouts, you’re eating well, you’re getting enough sleep, and though you’ve done everything you can think of, you aren’t getting the results you’d expected. As silly as this sounds, you may need to just stand up a little straighter and learn how to improve your posture.

Poor posture wreaks havoc on your body’s alignment, which can affect your spine, shoulders, hips, and knees. This, in turn, affects your flexibility and mobility, muscle strength, and joint health.  As an added bonus, standing up straight will cause you to look leaner and more confident, right off the bat.

One way to improve your posture is to focus on workouts that strengthen your core, shoulders, and upper back. These muscles help stabilize your entire body, so they could potentially be to blame if you’re having postural issues. If you’re ready to work towards better posture, check out the following workouts:

Better Posture Workout from Fitness Blender

If you find yourself slumping over, this is the workout for you. This 17-minute video is great for building strength and improving flexibility in your shoulders, chest, and back!

Best Bodyweight Ab Exercises from Greatist

A strong body starts with a strong core. Need a refresher course on some awesome abdominal moves? This post covers everything from crunches to toe taps.

Better Posture: 6 Ways to Straighten Up from Women’s Health

This post breaks down some possible issues you may have with your posture and offers moves that target each issue.  Many times, a certain stretch or strengthening move can make all the difference.

Exercises to Correct Bad Posture from LIVESTRONG

Here are four moves you can complete every single day in order to improve your posture. Try them out the next time you have a few minutes to spare.

Who knew that standing up straight could make such a difference? If you’ve ever worked on your posture, let us know what benefits you noticed!

 

** Article was found at http://www.bumblebee.com/how-to-improve-your-posture/. 

SportsFit of Leakesville Member of the Month, Celena Easterling.

Celena Easterling.JPG

Congratulations to our SportsFit of Leakesville Member of the Month, Celena Easterling! Celena is 35 years old and has been a member since April 2015. She has lost over 40 pounds by working hard at the gym everyday. She is one of the most dedicated members we have at our gym!

When asking Celena why she chose SportsFit as her gym she said,

“My friend asked me to come with her. It has been the best experience ever and has helped me become a ‘better me.’ The people are awesome and motivate me everyday!”

Celena’s motivation for working out is,

“Jamie McLeod, Kim Green, Kim Pierce and so many others that are killing it to reach their own goals. 

Keep working hard Celena! We are so proud of you!

PT Tip of the Week: Stretching myths. “Do I stretch before, or after I workout?”

“Research shows that stretching is best done AFTER you workout. You should actually jog, walk, or bike for about 10-20 minutes before you workout to warm your body up & better prevent injury. You get more results out of stretching/flexibility exercises post workout when your muscles are fatigued.”
– Josh Davis, PT at the Encore Rehabilitation-Hayden Clinic.


Great Article! “The One Exercise That Just Might Change Your Running Forever” via the Huffington Post.

“What if all it took to improve your running immeasurably was a few minutes marching in place?

In a 2011 New York Times Magazine feature, Christopher McDougall, author ofBorn to Run: A Hidden Tribe, Super Athletes and the Greatest Race the World Has Never Seen experimented with just that.

“I was leafing through the back of an out-of-print book, a collection of runners’ biographies called ‘The Five Kings of Distance,’ when I came across a three-page essay from 1908 titled ‘W. G. George’s Own Account From the 100-Up Exercise,’” he writes. “According to legend, this single drill turned a 16 year old with almost no running experience into the foremost racer of his day.”

Walter Goodall George’s earliest sporting interests were rugby and cycling, but he went on to win over 1,000 amateur prizes and races and set long-standing records as a professional runner. “He became unbeatable over the middle distances in an era before training became scientific,” the Oxford Dictionary Of National Biography writes, all while pioneering his own personal brand of “scientific” training, namely the 100-Up. In 1878, at age 19, he wrote a plan to break the then-world record for the mile — and proceeded to run nearly exactly his plan’s predicted time in 1886. In addition to his 100-Up essay cited by McDougall, he also published a short book on the exercise in 1913, according to the Oxford DNB.

George’s 100-Up routine is divided into two parts, the minor and the major. The minor involves standing with both feet about eight inches apart “and your arms cocked in running position,” McDougall writes. Then, raise one knee at a time to hip height, bringing it back down lightly to its original position. All that’s left after that is to repeat this movement 100 times. The major involves the same movement at a higher speed. McDougall quotes George: “The body must be balanced on the ball of the foot, the heels being clear of the ground and the head and body being tilted very slightly forward…. Now, spring from the toe, bringing the knee to the level of the hip…. Repeat with the other leg and continue raising and lowering the legs alternately. This action is exactly that of running.”

Sounds a little too simple, no?

Experienced runners will likely recognize these movements as the tried-and-true running drill commonly referred to as high knees, a simple way to up strength and endurance of the hip flexor and quad, according to New York Road Runners (NYRR). Straightforward as it looks, high knees –and other running drills — canhelp you become a better runner, says NYRR coach John Honerkamp. The 100-Up is essentially exaggerated running form, and performing 100 repetitions can help build muscle memory during a similar state of fatigue that a runner might experience at the end of a tough workout or a grueling race, he says.

But it’s the focus on form that’s most important. “You’re reinforcing poor form if you’re doing it improperly,” says Honerkamp. “Once you stop doing it correctly, you shouldn’t do it at all.” That means concentrating not just on returning each foot to its starting point, but paying attention to arm swing, keeping the core stable and landing close to your center of gravity on the balls of your feet every single time, he says. For most 100-Up beginners, 100 reps is a long-term goal. Aim to start with maybe 20 repetitions instead — or however many you can complete with perfect form.

Don’t expect to see immediate results, either, Honerkamp warns. Running on your toes, typically considered more efficient because you’re spending less time on the ground, may be the end goal, but heel strikers need to ease into adaptations. “I worry about people trying to drastically change,” says Honerkamp. “It’s something to work on and think about, but don’t over-think or overcorrect,” he says.

Whether or not you devote yourself to the 100-Up for life or simply dabble in running form drills periodically, incorporating focus on form into a warmup or regular training routine is a good idea, says Honerkamp. “People skip [warmups] because they’re busy getting out of the door,” he says, “but five minutes probably will go a long way.”

 

Source: Klein, S. (2014, June 4). The One Exercise That Just Might Change Your Running Forever. . Retrieved June 20, 2014, from http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/06/04/100-up-running_n_5406664.html

“10 Timeless Fitness Laws” by Pam Foxx

“In the not-so-distant past, your food grew on a farm. Meals were home-cooked (on an actual fire, in an actual stove). The outdoors was your gym. Watches? They tracked time, not activity. Blue light, texting neck, and the masses getting supersized by McDonald’s were issues for a future generation.

Yet somewhere along the way, conventional wisdom got muddled with modern mechanisms. And the results weren’t pretty. We became much more sedentary and got fatter. And slower. And weaker (seriously). At the table, our food began to look less and less like it ever came from the ground.

“Western society is the most overfed but malnourished, sick society due to the imbalance of physical activity and real nourishment, says Stacy Sims, MSc, Ph.D., co-founder of Osmo Nutrition. “The body is designed to move all the time and use food that supports health, not quick hits of ‘feel good’ sugar and fat.”

So how do we go back? By homing in on the fundamentals and returning to the principles that have stood the test of time. Here, 10 laws of fitness your grandfather would approve of.

 

#1: Perfect the Pushup

When Charles Atlas promised the men of America that he’d transform them from weaklings into masses of muscle, the fitness industry was forever changed. But “Dynamic Tension”—for all its faults—also had its strengths. It was a program based on the basics: bodyweight. As the legend goes, Atlas studied lions, noticing that animals had no exercise equipment. They had no gyms. Instead, they pitted one muscle against another. And dropping down and giving 10—or 20 or 50—should still have its place in your routine. “With proper form, your pushups and pull-ups are still the best exercises you can do. They engage your core with a functional push-pull action,” says Sims.

 

#2: Do It Right—or Stop Doing It

Focus on form. If your technique is all wrong, you might be doing more harm than good. Why? Misalignment means the biomechanics of movement are out of whack.  The result: increased stress in different joints and potential muscle imbalances—the perfect setup for overuse, chronic pain, and injury, Sims says.

But mastering the “how to” isn’t all about taking preventative measures. “The other aspect of proper form is that you end up using the smaller, stabilizing muscles giving you core stability for daily movement,” Sims explains. And if you’re engaging your muscles all day—with good posture (yes, you really should pull your shoulders back), or by perfecting a pushup—you’re building core strength without realizing it. Slouched over, resting on your elbows, back twisted? It should be no surprise that you make grandpa noises when getting up from your chair.

 

#3: Drink, Baby, Drink

Athletes have been around far longer than Gatorade and the new class of beverages strewn across supermarket shelves (ones that promise to replenish, hydrate, and boost performance). And when a run was no more than a run, athletes didn’t swear by high-concentration sugary liquids.

When a workout isn’t long enough or intense enough to result in severe fatigue, plain old water works, says Matt Fitzgerald, sports nutritionist, and author of thebook Diet Cults. “In fact, it’s not necessary to drink anything in most workouts lasting less than an hour,” he adds. That’s not to say that drink scientists aren’t onto something: “You need a small amount of sodium to actually pull water into the body,” says Sims. That’s why low-concentration approaches (Nuun, SOS, and Sims’ OSMO) have become popular.

 

#4: Eat a Quality Breakfast

Rising with the sun means more hours to move and more hours to eat well. “One of the overlooked benefits of eating breakfast is that it provides an early and additional opportunity to make progress toward meeting daily quotas for high-quality food types such as vegetables and fruit,” says Fitzgerald.

It’s not hard to start knocking out nutritional requirements before your day begins either—one serving of vegetables or fresh berries added to whole-grain cereal—can make all the difference, says Fitzgerald.

Just remember composition, says Sims. A croissant and a coffee won’t cut it: “You wake up with high levels of cortisol (the belly fat hormone), and adding sugar and caffeine will perpetuate cortisol’s actions,” she says.

 

#5: Repeat After Us (One More Time): I Will Eat Real Food

You won’t find the recipe for a healthy diet on the back of a package. Change the way a food naturally exists, and you change the way your body absorbs it. “There is a disconnect between the marketing claims of pre-packaged food and real food made from scratch. And food can’t just be reduced to single compounds,” says says Allen Lim, Ph.D., founder of Skratch Labs.

To that extent, Fitzgerald has spent time analyzing world-class endurance athletes—a group as fit and healthy as any population on earth—finding a simple trend: “what I call ‘agnostic healthy eating,’” he says. What that means: eating inculturally normal ways, but not avoiding food groups entirely; filling meals with vegetables, fruit, nuts and seeds, fish and high-quality meat, whole grains, and dairy; and only sparingly eating low-quality refined grains, processed meat, and sweets. “If this formula is good enough for athletes who place tremendous demands on their bodies, it’s good enough for us,” he says.

 

#6: Feel Your Way to Faster

The most sophisticated and reliable fitness monitoring device that exists—or will ever exist—isn’t a device at all: it’s your brain, says Fitzgerald. “If your body needs rest, your brain will communicate that to your conscious awareness in the form of feelings of fatigue and low motivation,” he explains. The symptom: a greater perceived effort: “If the body is fatigued or if its performance capacity is compromised, the brain will have to work harder to get the same level of output, and the greater the effort the exerciser will perceive.”

On the other hand? If your body is responding well to your training and is ready for more hard work, your brain will let you know that too in no uncertain terms, Fitzgerald says.

 

#7: Lighten Up and Have Some Fun

“The more you enjoy your training, the more you’ll put into it,” says Fitzgerald. “And the more you put into it, the more you’ll get out of it.” The research agrees: Your best efforts will likely come when you’re having the most fun, a 2012 study by Alan St. Clair Gibson of the University of Worcester found. Find something you like and the addiction will come naturally: “Research indicates that the association of ‘fun’ with things you do perpetuates stress release, making you want to go back for more,” says Sims.

 

#8: Recover. No, Really: RECOVER.

One of the problems with the evolution of cross-training is that you can go hard every day. The problem: That’s not what your body needs. The key is finding an easy-hard cycle you can give into, says Michael Joyner, M.D., and physiologist and anesthesiologist at the Mayo Clinic. “People have forgotten to make the hard days harder and the easy days easier.” Think in terms of “active rest”—a 3- or 4-mile run for a distance runner, calisthenics, jumping rope, or classic conditioning drills, Joyner says. “That’s really important.”

 

#9: It’s Not All About the Bike, the Shoes, or the Compression Underwear

Aerodynamics, biomechanics, breathability—they’re words that get a lot of ink (on labels, in magazines, and in the scripts of gear salespeople across the world). And yeah, tech has its perks. Breathable fabrics make long and hot hikes more bearable. But will your gear always make the difference?

A recent University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill study found only 14 percent of runners who laced up in lightweight kicks reported injury in a year’s time; almost half of runners in traditional sneakers did. So plus one for minimalism? Not so fast. The same University of North Carolina research revealed that people who chose traditional shoes landed differently from those who donned the minimalist shoes (on their heel or mid-foot versus on their forefoot).

The point: Everyone is different. And gear that works is subjective. “Good gear makes things more enjoyable, and most importantly prevents injury,” says Sims. So don’t skimp on no-brainers: proper bike fit, shoes, and protective items—but don’t become slaves to them.

 

#10: Never Stop Moving

Take this in the most expansive and philosophical way: Build movement into all aspects of your life—work, home, play—and throughout your life. You name the disease and exercise is the cure. “It’s proven to reduce the likelihood of weight gain, diabetes, heart disease, stroke, liver disease, cancer, Alzheimer’s, osteoporosis,sexual dysfunction, and a host of infectious diseases,” says Fitzgerald. Work out, and not only will you be healthier, but happier, more confident, and (bonus!) smarter, Fitzgerald adds.”

 

Source: http://www.outsideonline.com/fitness/bodywork/the-fit-list/10-Timeless-Fitness-Laws.html