Running

Boston Marathoner & Physical Therapist Bonnie Yesian

Bonnie Yesian PT Boston Marathon 2 April 2019 Dothan RevisedBonnie Yesian PT Boston Marathon 3 April 2019 Dothan Revised

Encore Rehabilitation-Dothan is proud to give a shoutout to our very own Physical Therapist Bonnie Yesian on the completion of her 13th Boston Marathon Run! Way to go, Bonnie!

“I’ve been running since 1994 and started training for my first marathon in 2000. Since then I’ve completed 25 marathons along with numerous half marathons and shorter distance runs. I have now completed 13 Boston Marathons. Other races have included the New York Marathon; Chicago Marathon; California International Marathon (Sacramento); St. George Marathon; Houston Marathon; and Austin Marathon. I obviously like the sport but even more than that, I’ve loved all the extra benefits and unexpected life lessons running has taught me over the years. I’ve met the most amazing people and lifelong friends through running. I hope to continue as long as the good Lord allows me to run!” ~ Bonnie Yesian, PT

Boston Marathoner and Encore Rehabilitation Physical Therapist Bonnie Yesian, right, with Clinic Director Lee Borcik #EncoreRehab

Encore Rehabilitation-Dothan Clinic Director Lee Borcik, PT, with Boston Marathoner and Encore Rehabilitation Physical Therapist Bonnie Yesian

Encore Rehabilitation-Dothan
345 Healthwest Drive
Dothan, Alabama 36303
334-836-4523
Find Encore Rehabilitation-Dothan on Facebook by clicking here 

encorerehab.com


Jess Hoffman, Jr. is Athlete of the Month for Encore Rehabilitation-Dothan

Say hello to Matthew Rugger, LAT, ATC

Berkley Smith – Gift Basket Winner at Encore Rehabilitation-Dothan

Clinical Director Emily LaRue is Running Strong!

Encore Rehabilitation Clinical Director Emily LaRue, DPT, is seen her with her friend, Jill. #EncoreRehab

Encore Rehabilitation-Hayden Clinical Director Emily LaRue, DPT, recently competed in the Oak Barrel Half Marathon in Lynchburg, Tennessee! Emily says, “I love to run! I do 5Ks regularly but only one half marathon a year.”

Recently, Emily ran in the Decatur First Priority 5K Run were she came in first in her age group!

Emily, on the left, is seen here with her friend, Jill, at the Oak Barrel Half.

Great job, Emily! Keep running strong!

Encore Rehabilitation-Hayden
1387 State Highway 160
Warrior, Alabama 35180
205-647-6849
Find Encore Rehabilitation-Hayden on Facebook by clicking here

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Clinic Director Dawn O’Keefe- Encore Rehabilitation-Beaumont

Dawn O'Keefe DPT PT ATC Photo 2 Revised

Meet Dawn O’Keefe, PT, DPT, ATC, Cert. DN, Clinic Director at Encore Rehabilitation-Beaumont! Dawn has been a clinician in the Hattiesburg area for 26 years and with Encore Rehabilitation for 17 years. Dawn’s expertise is in providing quality one-on-one care for each of her patients.

Dawn holds a Bachelor of Science in Psychology and Biology from the University of Southern Mississippi. She obtained her Bachelor of Science in Physical Therapy from Louisiana State University Medical Center-New Orleans and her Doctorate of Physical Therapy from the University of Mississippi Medical Center.  In addition to being a Physical Therapist, Dawn is also a Certified Athletic Trainer. Most recently she has obtained her Dry Needling Certification.

Dawn and her husband, Matt have two daughters, Jordan and Lauren. In her free time, Dawn likes to exercise and run. She has participated with the same girls running group since 1997. Dawn has completed several half marathons and triathlons as well as one marathon. She is a native of Metairie, Louisiana.

At Encore Rehabilitation, we LOVE to see you move!

 

Andrew Sweeney – Athlete of the Month for Saint Bernard and Encore Rehabilitation – Cullman

Andrew Sweeney Cullman

Congratulations to Andrew Sweeney, Athlete of the Month for Saint Bernard Prep School and Encore Rehabilitation – Cullman!

Andrew is a Senior and runs Cross Country for the Saints. This fall, he has enjoyed incredible success with multiple First Place finishes including First Place at Class 1A-2A Sectionals. In addition, Andrew also took First Place at the AHSAA State Cross Country Finals where he set a new State Record with a time of 16:02! His skills have earned him a scholarship to the University of Alabama- Huntsville.

Way to go, Andrew! We wish you the best of success as you complete your senior year!

Alabama State University – Benjamin Lee Knight Memorial 5K

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Benjamin Lee Knight

Saturday, October 21, 2017 marked the inaugural run for the Alabama State University Annual Benjamin Lee Knight Memorial 5K. It was a fantastic fall day to remember Ben, a recent physical therapist graduate from Alabama State (ASU). He passed away June 4, 2017 while hiking in the mountains of Arizona. His fellow students have organized this annual 5K to honor him and his legacy. Ben was known as a selfless servant, a defender of the broken and widowed, and a tender-hearted man who lived life to the fullest by deeply loving those around him.

Encore Rehabilitation is proud to partner with ASU to sponsor this event. Over 100 runners registered for this year’s run. Monies from the event go to local charities and organizations. Thank you to everyone who participated in this year’s run.

Heights Heroes 5K

Encore Performance Rehab was proud to be involved with the Heights Heroes 5K held October 14, 2017 in Birmingham, Alabama. This event supports the Vestavia Elementary Cahaba Heights PTO. The weather was perfect for a fall 5K. Congratulations to our very own, Erik Marchase, for placing 1st in his age division and 5th Place overall! Awesome job, Erik! We appreciate everyone for coming out to support the event!

Winfield Encore Athlete of the Month, Braden Pyron.

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Congratulations to the Winfield Encore Athlete of the Month, Braden Pyron! Braden is a sophomore, multi-sport athlete at Marion County High School. He has been a member of the varsity Football, Basketball, Baseball and Track teams for 4 years now and wears jersey #2, #5, and #25. During his 4 year athletic career, Braden has wracked up quite an impressive amount of awards:

Football: 2x All State Football, 2x All-Conference, 2x All-State 2x All-County

Basketball: NW Region All Tournament, All-County, 2x All Conference, Final Four

Baseball: 3x All-County Honorary Mention

Track: All-County track, 2x All-Conference, 2x All-Sectional, 2x All-State, and a State Championship.

Braden will graduate in the class of 2019 and has a 4.0 GPA. He is the son of Blaine and Valarie Pyron.

Diamondhead Athlete of the Month, Brooke Fagan.

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Congratulations to the Diamondhead Athlete of the Month, Brooke Fagan! Brooke is a junior multi-sport athlete at Hancock High School in Kiln, MS. She has been a member of the Lady Hawks Softball and Volleyball teams for 5 years now and wears jersey #9 and #10 respectively. Brooke has quite a few impressive awards from her 5 year sports career- the 2015 South State MVP in volleyball and was a member of the 2015 All-State Volleyball team. She also has a 3.5 GPA and plans to play softball in college and major in sports medicine. She is the daughter of John and Jennifer Fagan.

“How to Start a Running Program” by Andrea Bowens, DPT, OCS, Encore Inverness Clinic.

“Happy New Year! Have you made New Year’s resolutions to be more active this year? Do you want to start running and don’t know where to begin? Running has many benefits to your overall health and well-being. First, participating in exercise activities, including cardiovascular exercise like running, can boost mood, energy, and improve quality of sleep. Secondly, running at a moderate pace not only helps burn calories during exercise but also contributes to an “afterburn” effect, during which the body continues to burn calories for a period of time after the run is completed. Lastly, impactful exercise like running will help to prevent bone loss in the lower extremities, which can be a health concern for older adults.

While there are numerous benefits to exercise, inadequate shoe wear, training, and mechanics can increase your risk for injury. When beginning an exercise program it is important to start by selecting a pair of shoes that is made for your type of foot. Local running shoe stores are a great place to start when trying to determine if you need a shoe with more structure, cushion, or need a specific type of insert due to your foot posture. Additionally, experts in running recommend replacing your shoes every 300-500 miles. Don’t underestimate the value of a good running shoe in keeping you injury free!

The next step to beginning a running program is to ease into the exercise to allow your body to adapt to the new demands. If you are beginning exercise for the first time or after a long break, begin with walking and slowly increase your distance over time. Also, it is beneficial to begin performing strengthening exercises, especially for the core and hips, to help prevent injury caused by weakness or muscle imbalances. Once you have increased your endurance and overall fitness with walking and strength training, your body is now better prepared to begin running. Begin with interval walking and running and then gradually increase the run time and decrease the walk time over the course of several weeks. Once you can run continuously for 20-30 minutes, then it is appropriate to start increasing your distance and then pace. Online resources, such as Runner’s World, have articles and training programs that can help develop a program for you and your running goals. Set realistic goals for yourself so that you can achieve them without suffering a setback due to injury.

Improper running mechanics can lead to injuries in runners over time. Overuse injuries, which occur in both novice and elite runners, can become a nagging problem and often sideline a runner for a period of time. This is where a physical therapist can be of value to you. Physical therapists can evaluate your flexibility, strength, alignment, and movement patterns. A comprehensive evaluation by a physical therapist will help determine factors that may lead to inefficiencies in running form or abnormal mechanics, thus leading to injury. If you do suffer an injury, consider being evaluated by a physical therapist who can devise a program specific to your body and injury. Take caution with performing generic exercise routines found online because there are often other individual factors contributing to an injury. For further reading on injury prevention with running and specific types of running injuries, visit the American Physical Therapy Association’s website for patients at www.moveforwardpt.com.’

Great Article! “The One Exercise That Just Might Change Your Running Forever” via the Huffington Post.

“What if all it took to improve your running immeasurably was a few minutes marching in place?

In a 2011 New York Times Magazine feature, Christopher McDougall, author ofBorn to Run: A Hidden Tribe, Super Athletes and the Greatest Race the World Has Never Seen experimented with just that.

“I was leafing through the back of an out-of-print book, a collection of runners’ biographies called ‘The Five Kings of Distance,’ when I came across a three-page essay from 1908 titled ‘W. G. George’s Own Account From the 100-Up Exercise,’” he writes. “According to legend, this single drill turned a 16 year old with almost no running experience into the foremost racer of his day.”

Walter Goodall George’s earliest sporting interests were rugby and cycling, but he went on to win over 1,000 amateur prizes and races and set long-standing records as a professional runner. “He became unbeatable over the middle distances in an era before training became scientific,” the Oxford Dictionary Of National Biography writes, all while pioneering his own personal brand of “scientific” training, namely the 100-Up. In 1878, at age 19, he wrote a plan to break the then-world record for the mile — and proceeded to run nearly exactly his plan’s predicted time in 1886. In addition to his 100-Up essay cited by McDougall, he also published a short book on the exercise in 1913, according to the Oxford DNB.

George’s 100-Up routine is divided into two parts, the minor and the major. The minor involves standing with both feet about eight inches apart “and your arms cocked in running position,” McDougall writes. Then, raise one knee at a time to hip height, bringing it back down lightly to its original position. All that’s left after that is to repeat this movement 100 times. The major involves the same movement at a higher speed. McDougall quotes George: “The body must be balanced on the ball of the foot, the heels being clear of the ground and the head and body being tilted very slightly forward…. Now, spring from the toe, bringing the knee to the level of the hip…. Repeat with the other leg and continue raising and lowering the legs alternately. This action is exactly that of running.”

Sounds a little too simple, no?

Experienced runners will likely recognize these movements as the tried-and-true running drill commonly referred to as high knees, a simple way to up strength and endurance of the hip flexor and quad, according to New York Road Runners (NYRR). Straightforward as it looks, high knees –and other running drills — canhelp you become a better runner, says NYRR coach John Honerkamp. The 100-Up is essentially exaggerated running form, and performing 100 repetitions can help build muscle memory during a similar state of fatigue that a runner might experience at the end of a tough workout or a grueling race, he says.

But it’s the focus on form that’s most important. “You’re reinforcing poor form if you’re doing it improperly,” says Honerkamp. “Once you stop doing it correctly, you shouldn’t do it at all.” That means concentrating not just on returning each foot to its starting point, but paying attention to arm swing, keeping the core stable and landing close to your center of gravity on the balls of your feet every single time, he says. For most 100-Up beginners, 100 reps is a long-term goal. Aim to start with maybe 20 repetitions instead — or however many you can complete with perfect form.

Don’t expect to see immediate results, either, Honerkamp warns. Running on your toes, typically considered more efficient because you’re spending less time on the ground, may be the end goal, but heel strikers need to ease into adaptations. “I worry about people trying to drastically change,” says Honerkamp. “It’s something to work on and think about, but don’t over-think or overcorrect,” he says.

Whether or not you devote yourself to the 100-Up for life or simply dabble in running form drills periodically, incorporating focus on form into a warmup or regular training routine is a good idea, says Honerkamp. “People skip [warmups] because they’re busy getting out of the door,” he says, “but five minutes probably will go a long way.”

 

Source: Klein, S. (2014, June 4). The One Exercise That Just Might Change Your Running Forever. . Retrieved June 20, 2014, from http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/06/04/100-up-running_n_5406664.html